Open Book History

The Korean War and the Containment of Communism

For decades, conflict has surrounded Korea. Whether it be the fight between China and Japan for control of the country in the Sino-Japanese War, or the Civil War that brought Asia into the first military action of the Cold War, Korea has always been surrounded by hostility and finally fell into Japanese hands who would… Continue reading The Korean War and the Containment of Communism

Open Book History

The Anaconda Plan: Using Vicksburg to Constrict Enemy Lines

Perched on top a majestic bluff sits the small town of Vicksburg, Mississippi. With a seat right on the Mississippi River, the town is a prime location for commerce and trade. This was especially true in the Summer of 1863 when the Confederate army held the city, making use of its steep bluffs and the… Continue reading The Anaconda Plan: Using Vicksburg to Constrict Enemy Lines

Open Book History

Women Show Agency Within the United States Sanitary Commission

One of the most interesting aspects of my research of Civil War medicine thus far is the methods women used to achieve their agendas during the Civil War. Being opposed to women as volunteers, both Surgeon General Lawson and Finley maintained that protestant women should not be exposed to the kinds of conditions produced by… Continue reading Women Show Agency Within the United States Sanitary Commission

Open Book History

Women in Ancient Rome: Discrimination, Double Standards, and Agency

Historically, women have been discriminated against and have held lower social positions than their male counterpoints. This is no exception in Ancient Rome as women were both exploited and molested at the hands of their husbands and even their parents. Due to the belief that women were weak and “light-minded”, Roman laws were put in… Continue reading Women in Ancient Rome: Discrimination, Double Standards, and Agency

Open Book History

Democracy, Nationalism, and Economic Expansion: An Analysis of Western Influence on the Policies of Dr. Sun Yat Sen

Known for his leadership in China during the 1911 revolution and regarded as the father of China, Dr. Sun Yat Sen may be one of the most influential political leaders of all time. Being both well-traveled and well educated, Sun possessed insight about the world, particularly the Western world which others in China during this… Continue reading Democracy, Nationalism, and Economic Expansion: An Analysis of Western Influence on the Policies of Dr. Sun Yat Sen

Open Book History

Sacrificing One for the Good of Many: The Survival Lottery

If someone is dying, is it the duty of society to save them? Standard moral ethics says, yes; but under what circumstances? Is society responsible for saving a convicted serial murderer facing the death penalty? What if a building was on fire and trapped in one room is your family of four and in another,… Continue reading Sacrificing One for the Good of Many: The Survival Lottery

Open Book History

A quick look into Fitzpatrick’s Everyday Stalinisum

Stalinist Russia is a popular topic among historians and scholars and has inspired questions such as; what effect did the political policies of the era have on people of the Soviet Union and how did Stalin’s policies change social classes and hierarchical structure of the state? In her book, Everyday Stalinism, Sheila Fitzpatrick gives many… Continue reading A quick look into Fitzpatrick’s Everyday Stalinisum

Open Book History

Women and Worship: Hinduism in India

It is a breathtaking, spiritual, inviting and divine experience as quoted by some Indians. These feelings are used to describe the mystic and cherished tradition that is Indian Hindu rituals and celebrations. These rituals and practices are not just beautiful, but serve as a way for women to be more active in the household worship… Continue reading Women and Worship: Hinduism in India

Open Book History

The Establishment of State Destruction: Hitler’s Connection to the Mass Murder of the Holocaust

When the Holocaust is mentioned, Hitler is the first name which comes to mind. The question then is always regarding the methods in which he led men to murder millions of innocent Jews and minority groups, but the answer may not lie with Adolf Hitler, but within the chaos and statelessness that he created in… Continue reading The Establishment of State Destruction: Hitler’s Connection to the Mass Murder of the Holocaust

Open Book History

The Devil Complex: A Closer look at Conformity and the Bystander Effect

As I sat there behind my desk uninterestingly flipping through emails on my phone, a blind classmate entered the room, guide dog in tow. As she helplessly fumbled, tripped on her own feet and headed to the wrong desk, the classmates present just watched. To my dismay, five minutes had passed; five minutes I sat voiceless, watching with the rest of them. For five minutes I refused to help because after all, no one else was. It was the realization that, while researching the Holocaust and how Hitler could have had such an impact on his men to where they would commit systematic murder and then defend it with, “We did what we were told,” or, “We did it because the extermination of the ‘imperfect’ race was the duty of all Germans,” was the same principle of conformity exhibited by myself and my classmates. Although our indiscretion was on a small scale compared to Nazi Germany, the idea that anyone could be affected by this, is frightening. In comparison to the Nazi’s, I had also heard about another unfortunate case highlighting the bystander effect and the power of conformity. In the 1960’s a woman was stabbed on a New York street. The dozens of tenants living in the lofts and apartments above the crime scene stood at their windows, witnesses to the crime. Although they heard the woman's scream, no one tried to help or intervene. The women ran around the corner where she was stabbed eight more times by the attacker before lying dead on the sidewalk. There were thirty seven witnesses to the crime; only one passer-byer called for help after it was too late.