Open Book History

The Korean War and the Containment of Communism

For decades, conflict has surrounded Korea. Whether it be the fight between China and Japan for control of the country in the Sino-Japanese War, or the Civil War that brought Asia into the first military action of the Cold War, Korea has always been surrounded by hostility and finally fell into Japanese hands who would… Continue reading The Korean War and the Containment of Communism

Social Justice and Political Dealings

Political Culture and Patriarchy: The United States and India

There are several similarities between American political culture and India's concerning women's rights and patriarchy. This may seem like a stark, overwhelming contrast as women in India have been fighting brutal and unjust treatment in the country for centuries, however, the same could be argued for the women of the United States. Although the United… Continue reading Political Culture and Patriarchy: The United States and India

Open Book History

A quick look into Fitzpatrick’s Everyday Stalinisum

Stalinist Russia is a popular topic among historians and scholars and has inspired questions such as; what effect did the political policies of the era have on people of the Soviet Union and how did Stalin’s policies change social classes and hierarchical structure of the state? In her book, Everyday Stalinism, Sheila Fitzpatrick gives many… Continue reading A quick look into Fitzpatrick’s Everyday Stalinisum

Open Book History

Women and Worship: Hinduism in India

It is a breathtaking, spiritual, inviting and divine experience as quoted by some Indians. These feelings are used to describe the mystic and cherished tradition that is Indian Hindu rituals and celebrations. These rituals and practices are not just beautiful, but serve as a way for women to be more active in the household worship… Continue reading Women and Worship: Hinduism in India

Open Book History

The Establishment of State Destruction: Hitler’s Connection to the Mass Murder of the Holocaust

When the Holocaust is mentioned, Hitler is the first name which comes to mind. The question then is always regarding the methods in which he led men to murder millions of innocent Jews and minority groups, but the answer may not lie with Adolf Hitler, but within the chaos and statelessness that he created in… Continue reading The Establishment of State Destruction: Hitler’s Connection to the Mass Murder of the Holocaust

Social Justice and Political Dealings

Religious Discrimination or Political Correctness Gone Mad: A Closer look into the Fight for the Pledge

At a Flag Day speech in 1954, Eisenhower elaborated on his feelings about the place of religion in public life when he discussed why he had wanted to include “under God” in the pledge of allegiance, “In this way we are reaffirming the transcendence of religious faith in America’s heritage and future; in this way we shall constantly strengthen those spiritual weapons which forever will be our country’s most powerful resource in peace and in war” (President Eisenhower signs “In God We Trust” into law). In 1956, President Eisenhower signed the words, ‘one nation under God’ into law as the nation’s official motto, just two years after having the phrase inserted into the Pledge of Allegiance. Ever since this addition, its given reason to some to deem the pledge unconstitutional. As Americans with a country founded on the principle of Christianity, it seems almost preposterous that after 238 years some are now fighting to strip the nation of the very foundation it was built on. Contrary to popular beliefs, one of the Framers first orders of business after establishing our Nation’s government, was to circulate English bibles to all of the schools and homes in America. This may be exactly why the Constitution protects the people from government rule under the power of the “church” like that of England, yet the words “separation of church and state” are not found in our Nation’s Constitution (Religion and the Founding of the American Public).

Open Book History

Raising from the Ashes: The Lessons Learned and Practiced from Human Experimentation in the Holocaust

On October 25, 1946, twenty-three Nazi doctors stood trial for ‘crimes against humanity’. Out of the twenty-three physicians, sixteen were found guilty and seven were sent to their deaths by execution (Lifton 10). The crimes for which they were held responsible were that of true evil and disregard for basic human rights. Under their care,… Continue reading Raising from the Ashes: The Lessons Learned and Practiced from Human Experimentation in the Holocaust